Be Creative During School

B School (Business School) is a university-level institute that provides the degree in management or business administration courses at graduate and master level programme. Whenever a successful businessman reveals his success secrets it begins with his b-school campus life. A campus life that offers the perfect blend of education and business. It sustains professional conducts and creates practical learning experience to embrace the core basics of the management. B-school campus life has a huge impact on the students’ life on the interpersonal and professional conduct. To provide practical learning towards management and related subjects.

With changing business environment, evolving companies are demanding more than the graduates- the creative thinker and the creative leaders. Significantly, management conventions are putting their best to cater the needs of the companies. The focus is more on practical experience with the detailed knowledge of management studies. The campus life ensures this notion with the advancement in studies and technical expertise and thus, become the practical life training institute.

The class lectures in training institute are combined with the numbers of functional aspects. It includes learning either through the presentation, case study analysis, role play, psychometric analysis, swot analysis or online research and database. Faculty always guide students to how to shape their career and achieve their business goal. Along with the study advancement, the campus life offers extracurricular facilities to groom students. It includes a high-tech library, wi-fi enabled campus, cafeteria and free transportation services.

Different campus activities are carried out through the student clubs. These clubs are created in the different disciplines (Human Resources, Finance, Marketing, Arts Community) to develop practical implication of the subject knowledge. It creates a practical learning environment that develops and enhances the communication skills, the teamwork, the management skills as well as leadership that cannot be expected in any single day skill development class.

Avoid These Mistake During SAT Registration

After getting done with your SAT registration, you tend to look for the best SAT preparation techniques that eradicate all the risk factors and help you nail the exam successfully.

Registration is not the only factor that is important. Though, this is the easiest part of the process. After successfully acquiring SAT registration, there are many other factors to consider.

One of the most common questions that arises after SAT registration is How to avoid silly mistakes in the SAT exam?

This question is definitely a consequence of your frustration after SAT registration for scoring the best and also due to your disappointment after facing failure in the related exam (I was so close to the passing marks. I wish I could… ).

If we analyze the whole scenario, we conclude that it’s not just the mistakes that we make after the registration process, the fact is that we don’t even know how to avoid those mistakes. It totally depends upon the approach we select after acquiring SAT registration and how cautious we are while attempting the exam.

It sounds pretty cool that you are eligible for SAT registration and have undergone the entire registration process successfully. So, what’s the next thing to do after SAT registration?

The next step is to prepare for your SAT exam!

Mistakes to Avoid in SAT Exam

Below are mentioned the most common factors that lead towards making silly mistakes after registration:

  • Not properly or fully reading the instructions
  • Improperly filling the bubble sheet
  • Making minor arithmetic errors that lead towards affecting your whole solution
  • Inaccurately copying down the original question

Effective Strategies for Avoiding Mistakes after SAT RegistrationBelow are mentioned some strategies that you should follow to attempt the SAT exam successfully:

  • Solve the first things first
  • Read the questions carefully and write neatly
  • Manage your time carefully
  • Verify your question number and shade your answer carefully against it
  • Recognize the difficulty level of each question and solve the easier questions first so that you can save much of your time
  • Always read the question twice and all the instructions mentioned carefully so that you can have a clear idea about what the question is asking for
  • Try to solve each question using some different method or technique. If the answer is still same, Congratulations!
  • Always keep in mind the question number you are solving and the answer you are shading against it
  • One of the biggest DISASTERS is wrongly copying the original question. So, how can you write the right answer when you haven’t even noted down the right question? You need to be extremely careful in this regard

PracticePractice, practice and practice!

The key factor that can win the game for you is PRACTICE.

The more practice exams you take after SAT registration, the better you will perform in the SAT test. Even all your mistakes will be etched in your mind as a reminder of not repeating them in future. Also, you’ll be sure about your answer.

Bondage Of Education

From a very early age I can remember my parents, teachers, and friends discussing this idea of education. What it is, what it should be, what it could be, but more importantly how I would use it to “further” my life. I had this notion that education was going to school, memorizing what the teacher said, applying it to a test, and repeating the routine for the next twelve years. The term “career ready” is not only what gave me the desire to have straight A’s in high school, but what brought me to a university. I came with hope to finally break away from the restraint that I believed was only a result of what a high school education could do to an individual’s mind, but quickly came to realize that a “liberal education” from college was not that different. Liberal education was designed to free individuals from the bonds that society placed upon them, but present-day education is what holds those bonds together.

I will never forget the first time I failed a test. It was in fifth with one of my favorite teachers. I remember receiving the test back with a zero on the front and instantly covering the test up so no one could not see the sign of failure. The teacher must have seen my shock because I was told to stay after class. She explained to me how I had made a 100 but I did not “take the test right” which is what resulted in the zero. From then on, I developed what college students call “test anxiety.” I worked to follow directions, to be structured, and to never ask a question that could possibly be wrong. I made straight A’s, participated in school organizations, was president of my class, and lived to fill the resume that would be sent to potential colleges. I did what students are expected to do. When I came to college I was excited because I could finally learn outside the perimeters of standardized tests. What I did not expect was to hear phrases from professors such as, “don’t worry this will not be on the test,” or having to spend thirty minutes of class listening to students ask how many questions will be on the exam. Teachers from my high school always told us, “college will not be like this, so enjoy it while you can,” but it was all the same. Listen, take notes, memorize, take test, repeat.

I began to realize that maybe this was what education was intended to be. A system that engrains students with the idea that to conform and restrain one’s mind to standardization is what makes us “successful.” David Brooks discusses how college students are “goal-orientated… a means for self-improvement, resume-building, and enrichment. College is just one step on the continual stairway of advancement and they are always aware that they must get to the next step.” Students go through elementary, junior high, high school, and now even universities not to “free our minds” or truly educating ourselves, but to climb the ladder of social order. One can relate education to Plato’s cave allegory, “they are in it from childhood with their legs and necks in bonds so that they are fixed, seeing only in front of them unable because of the bond to turn their heads.” This system of education that parents, professors, politicians, employers, and even students talk so highly about is not about producing the world’s next great minds, it is about producing the world’s next source of capital. Society has taken a liberal education and twisted it to where it will fit students into its workplace.

Everyone says that your first semester of college is the hardest. You move away from home, meet new people, and are thrown into a whole new environment. I knew it would be tough, but never thought I would be the student that curled onto her dorm room rug and cried over a seventy-eight on a couple of tests. I had made back-to-back “failing grades” in my mind and had the mindset that I could never recover. What could I accomplish without a 4.0 GPA and four years on the Deans List? To make matters worse, I received a zero for a homework assignment. Believing that there must have been something wrong, I made my way to my TAs office hours where he proceeded to tell me that I did great on the assignment but had to give me a zero based on a small technicality. That is when I had the realization that a modern-day college education has nothing to do with a liberal education. From then on, every test I would take and grade that followed would no longer determine how I would go about learning. I decided that in order to receive a true liberal education I had to throw away every concept of what I thought education was. In Plato’s book I was reminded that “education is not what the professions of certain men assert it to be” and when I decided to make my way out of ‘the cave’ of education I was thankful for the realization that I had broken the bonds that society tried so hard to place tightly around me. Leo Strauss said that a “liberal education supplies us with experience in things beautiful,” and that is when an individual is truly free.

I sometimes think about where I would be if I had the mindset that I do now about education when I received that zero if fifth grade. Would I have waved it in the air as a badge of pride representing how I refused to conform to the institution instead of hiding it from my friends in shame or would I had done it all the same? A true liberal education is what enables individuals to achieve, admire, and model greatness. So, when I hear a professor repeat the phrase “don’t worry, this won’t be on the test,” a part of me wonders if even they have given up on helping break the bonds placed upon us.

Step To Make College Student Became Courageous

As educators, we know one of the best traits that can aid in success is confidence. Self-doubt can kill dreams and a lack of belief in oneself can deter anyone from achieving a goal and becoming successful. However, confidence is often something that we have or need at any given time. We need confidence, even for the smaller day to day routine things that we do. On the other hand, sometimes, we need courage to get through a situation. Courage is pushing through when things are tough or create fear. For example, it might take confidence to ace the final exam, but it takes courage to stick out a degree program when it puts finances in jeopardy, reduces work-life balance, and all your support systems are against you going for this goal.

As educators, we will see many students each year that need to build up their courage. They need our help and guidance on how to be courageous in a time of fearfulness or anxieties. Students face many life events along their four plus years with us, and to help them achieve their goal of earning a degree, we must also provide mentorship on how to be courageous.

Here are 3 ways you can guide students into being more courageous:

  1. Reduce Fears and Anxieties

If you want your students to be more courageous, remember that as a professor, your role is to teach, guide, model and inspire, not to show students how tough “the real world is.” Learning new content and balancing education with life is already hard enough, no need to instill fear on top of this. As an added bonus, as you minimize fears and anxieties, and students push through, they build confidence.

To minimize fears and anxieties in your students, there are several things you can do, here are some tips:

  • Set course expectations up front.
  • Link students to helpful resources.
  • Give them tips on what to do if they encounter technology problems.
  • Provide your contact information and answer emails/calls in less than 24 hours.
  • Give a little leeway in the event a student had a major life event occur during a specific week.
  • Humanize yourself. You can do this by sharing a little about who you are personally, doing videos in the courseroom, using humor, building rapport.
  • Don’t give negative feedback in the open forum. Use personal email or gradebook feedback.
  • Give feedback on assignments and discussion questions. This helps the student to know what they have done well with and where they can improve. No feedback leaves students in the dark as to what they can improve on and how.
  1. Encourage Students to Focus on What They Can Control

In a classroom setting, you are the authority. Students may feel intimidated at times or feel that they have limited power. Perhaps they don’t like the content, don’t understand it, or are having personal troubles while also trying to manage their education. As a professor, if you want to increase your student’s courage, help students to focus on what is in their control. This will help students persevere in the face of adversity or trials because they will realize they are not completely powerless.Here are some tips you can share with students to help empower them to take control over their education:

  • Give students tips on avoiding procrastination
  • Share resources on balancing life and work
  • Give students tools on how to achieve better time management
  • Help students become intentional about their leaning. You can provide them with assessments that can help them better understand how they learn. (Check out the Learning Connections Inventory (LCI) through Let Me learn).
  • Share school/university resources.
  • Educate students on the importance of, and how to, build support systems and strong networks.
  • Teach students how to create SMART goals.
  • Encourage students to take an honest look at the people and activities in their lives. Then have them personally assess what/who might be best to cut versus keep in order to achieve those SMART goals.
  1. Teach Communication Skills

It takes courage to do something when you are scared or to press on in the event of pain and sadness. It is important to let students know that they are valuable and can use their voice to make a difference. By teaching students how to speak up, you empower them to make a difference in their lives and the lives of others- and that often takes a lot of courage. In today’s society, the next generation in line must be heard. They are facing extreme levels of violence and rage, but the power of speech can change that and create a positive movement. As a professor, you can also educate your students on how to speak up on less socially involved issues, but still critical aspects of a student’s life; for example, how to speak up for an advancement or say no to outside tasks that don’t fit their goals.

Here are some ways you can help students improve their communication:

  • Educate students on the importance of various communication styles (formal, informal, verbal, non verbal).
  • Provide tips on how to use social media- alongside pros and cons.
  • Provide guidance on how to listen and the value of patience.
  • Educate students on how certain words can be perceived as having self-doubt. (For example, watching how often a student leads with “I think” or “I feel” in negotiating or business).
  • Model being respectful and discuss the importance of having an open mind.
  • Provide feedback on how to be clear and concise, yet substantially answer a question.
  • Share resources, such as books, articles and videos on how to communicate with confidence.

By boosting students’ levels of courage, we are helping them to persevere through the trials and tribulations that life throw at them while they are taking a leap of faith into bettering their lives. As we boost courage, we also instill confidence. Courage and confidence are two key ingredients into helping our students reach their goals, obtain dreams and earn their degree. It is in these amazing students and their achievements that we are fortunate enough as professors to leave a bit of our legacy, behind.